A microskiff that doubles as a super fishing kayak

What is a microskiff?

A microskiff is a small skiff, namely, lightweight, flat bottomed motorboat. Fishermen in the South use such boats for flats fishing, and in protected bays, estuaries and lakes, as well as on slow moving rivers. The microskiff is said to have evolved from dinghies. Typically, two fishermen man a microskiff.
But “Small and lightweight” means a boat that still requires transportation by trailer, and consequently, its owner must launch and beach it in boat ramps, which is often inconvenient.

Propulsion problems with typical microskiff

These small skiffs are are too wide and heavy to allow for paddling, and they are designed to be propelled with outboard gas engines, which is problematic for several reasons –
Outboard motors can run out of fuel or stall due to technical problems, and any electric trolling motor that may be on board would not be enough for going over long distances and/or in adverse weather conditions, fast currents, etc.
Both outboard motors and electric motors have propellers that require being immersed in water a couple of inches below the surface. This means that the effective draft of a typical microskiff is not very shallow, and it’s often incompatible with fishing in very shallow water, namely “skinny water”.
Draft issues also limit these small skiffs when it comes to available launching and beaching spots, which means that their owners depend on boat ramps, and this fact is known to cause frustration due to much time wasted on waiting and technical maneuvers instead of being available for fishing.
On top of this, propellers don’t perform particularly well in water that’s infested with  seaweed and grass. Anglers who fish in such waters know that they are particularly productive fisheries.

The myth of Poling

Small skiff manufacturers like to show pictures of fishermen who propel their microskiff through shallow water with a push pole. While possible, poling isn’t that practical in real world conditions, because it involves long intervals between pushes, and the big effort that’s invested in each push to accelerate is soon wasted when the boat decelerates as the pole is lifted out of the water in preparation for the next push. Accelerating is very wasteful in energy terms, and besides, being relatively wide and heavy makes skiffs lose momentum rapidly, so the person who uses a push pole to propel them gets tired in a short time.
Not many people are capable of poling a microskiff for more than a few minutes, namely for more than a few hundred yards. This is hardly enough for effective fishing.
To add insult to injury, the hulls of these small craft don’t track well, because they are neither very long nor narrow, and they do not feature fins, skegs or tunnels that can contribute to their directional stability. This is why poling a small skiff in a straight line isn’t easy, and it makes you waste a lot of time and efforts trying to maintain the course.
Poling is far less effective than paddling, and it’s wasteful even compared to rowing.

Bottom line –

To fish in very shallow water and vegetation-rich water, you need a boat that does not depend solely on its outboard motor, and one than you can easily, comfortably and effectively paddle, and not just pole.

Wavewalk’s W700 series: The optimal skiff for fishing

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A good microskiff is required to enable two fishermen or a solo fisherman to launch it, beach it, drive it, fish from it and paddle it in all water conditions, standing or seated.

This fishing craft must be very stable yet not too wide, so that it can be effective for paddling.

The twin-hull (catamaran) Wavewalk® 700 microskiff works perfectly both as a tandem and solo boat. This means for one angler too, in case a fishing buddy is not available.

The W700’s two narrow catamaran hulls make it track better than other boats of similar size, and this fact also guarantees top performance in terms of poling and paddling with either kayak or canoe paddles.

Weighing about 80 lbs, this optimal small skiff is sufficiently lightweight for transportation without a trailer, and for car-topping by just one person.

The W700 is the only two-person small skiff that offers such advantages, and ironically, this innovative craft is lighter than the typical fishing kayak, and much lighter than the typical tandem fishing kayak.

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No trailer, and all types of propulsion in one boat

Wavewalk’s revolutionary W700 microskiff is a portable, car-top boat, which means that it requires no trailer. Even one person can easily car top it. It works well in choppy water and in skinny water, and also in vegetation-rich water.  Two big and heavy fishermen can fish standing in it in full comfort. Driving it is easy, comfortable and fun, and it can be outfitted with a powerful outboard motor, and with an electric motor for trolling.
A crew of paddlers can easily and effectively paddle this microskiff either in a kayak mode, using dual-blade paddles, or in a canoe mode, with single blade paddles.

This lightweight craft tracks better than conventional skiffs, so that poling it is easier and more effective than poling other microskiff, including solo skiffs, namely skiffs designed to carry just one person.
The Wavewalk® 700 comes in all-white, which is the traditional color for this class of small fishing boats, and in a number of additional color combinations that are suitable for inland fishing.

Big Snook Caught on Fly in Florida Kayak Fishing Trip

Bob Smaldone caught the fish of the day (maybe the fish of the year) out of Ozello this morning. I’m glad I was close to snap a few pictures.
I mostly just spooked redfish :)
Gary

Bob standing in his kayak and fishing

Bob showing the big snook he caught in his kayak

Big snook caught in a fishing kayak

Bob standing on shore next to fishing kayaks

Bob is one of many fly fishermen who fishes standing in a W fishing kayak >>

Wavewalk 500 Review and Kayak Fishing Trip Report From Tennessee

By Jeremy Knight,

My dad and I decided to take our W fishing kayaks out on Tims Ford Lake.
I never imagined it could be so much fun! We were able to get the Wavewalks in places we can’t take our other boat.
We fished with small yellow and white jigs using the trolling method. We threw our lines out and paddled the Wavewalks so the line would trail behind the kayaks. We caught over a dozen fish in a very short amount of time!

Tennesse fishing trip: Striped bass in kayak

We decided to race back to the dock on our way in. I took the lead but eventually looked up to see Dad passing me up. He had the long W paddle with him which allows you to stand up while paddling the Wavewalk 500 fishing kayak. I couldn’t believe he won! Of course, I had to take my kayak back out for a second just to see what an advantage paddling while standing up would give a person.

stand up fishing kayak, TennesseeThe Wavewalk kayaks are very easy to load/unload, and maneuver in the water.
I was very comfortable while fishing, and I loved the fact I could stand up if I needed to.
I can’t wait for some more adventures…

Tennessee fishing trip - beached kayaks

Florida Kayak Fishing Expedition

Gary’s kayak anglers group is growing. says Gary: –

“We all stay in touch on the water via VHF radio, and conclude our trips with lunch at a local restaurant on the water where we trade fish stories, which makes for fun days –
More Ozello trout and redfish, and a few needle fish today fishing with fellow Wavewalkers Bob Smaldone and Dick Sherman along with a couple of other non-W friends. I happened to snap a picture of Bob taking a picture of me holding up a redfish.”

group of kayak fishermen fishing in Ozello, FLBob, the fly fisherman is paddling standing in his W fishing kayak, and sight fishing

red fish in kayak, Ozello, FL

trout in fishing kayak, Ozello, FL

Stand Up Fishing Kayak Review, By Steve Phillis, Victoria, Australia

Steve Phillis, from Bendingo, in Victoria, Australia, is an avid kayak paddler. Steve explained what got him interested in the W kayak:

I am passionate about health and just recently have succumbed to back pain as a result of kayaking.
Kayaking from a traditional kayak caused me considerable pain, and at the end of last year I was out of action for 2 months and spent a lot of money on extensive physiotherapy and even had to take time off from work, not to mention that I could not sit in a car or seat for more than 10 minutes without considerable pain. Determined to find an alternative, I came across wavewalk fishing kayaks, and purchased one.
Guess what? No back pain. I am wrapped and I have taken up learning to sail using it.

Steve standing in his fishing kayak on a lake in Victoria, Australia
Steve paddling in his fishing kayak on a lake in Victoria, Australia