My Experience With The Wavewalk 500 Fishing Kayak

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I have been flyfishing around the world for 20 years, much of it in a kayak.
I found only two things were missing: a comfortable seating position and the ability to stand up for sighting fish.
After studying videos at Wavewalk, I ordered an inventory of Wavewalk kayaks without even seeing one.
Upon receipt I tested the Wavewalk… -I am 70 years old, weigh 230, have a bad back, need a knee replacement, and have constant vertigo from a chronic ear condition.
During my initial test I was able to stand up and paddle and really enjoyed the seating position called Riding.
IF I CAN DO IT, ANYONE CAN!!
The Wavewalk 500 is fast and runs straight.
Everything you read is correct.

Glynn

big redfish caught in a kayak fishing trip Texas

Kayak Fishing – A Look To The Future

Kayak fishing is a nice concept, but this sport is facing growth problems. These problems are of a technical nature, and have to do with poor performance and unpleasant user-experience. They can be solved only through moving away from traditional fishing kayak designs, such as SOT, sit-in and hybrid kayaks (small, flat canoes), to the twinhull W kayak.

Have a look at this excerpt from a recently published, very long article about the big picture in kayak fishing:

“Kayak fishing ceased to be a novelty, and it’s safe to say there’s hardly anyone in America who fishes that hasn’t been exposed to the notion of fishing out of kayaks, one way or another.
Still, for the huge majority of American anglers, the notion of fishing from a kayak is by far more appalling than appealing, and those who fish from shore and from all other watercraft outnumber kayak anglers by a thousand to one ratio -”

The numbers discussed in this article are revealing, especially in view of the fact that kayak fishing is over a decade old, in today’s form, which is promoted by nearly all kayak manufacturers and fishing gear industry, and media.

This article goes over the major issues that have crippled kayak fishing as a recreational activity and sport since its beginnings. These serious problems restrict limit the number of anglers who join the sport, and get many existing participants to drop out. These problems are listed here by their order importance: Very poor ergonomics, insufficient stability, poor tracking, a limited range of travel, a too small storage space, and restricted mobility.

Also interesting are the article’s conclusions, which come from a comparison of the effect the above listed problems have on kayak fishing, to the performance of the new class of W fishing kayaks – relatively to the other kayaks commonly used by anglers:

“Does kayak fishing have a long term future?
We think it does, but only as a sensible sport and outdoor activity that would attract many more anglers, and not as the kind of unrewarding experience it currently is, which repels new participants while expelling existing ones.
The only venue is through an increase in use of W fishing kayaks rather than SOT, sit-in and hybrid kayaks. This is because W kayaks offer the solutions to all the problems discussed in this article, and some others, and these are the problems that make kayak fishing that marginal activity it has been so far in the much broader world of fishing.
Simply, as soon as realize that they can fish out of a watercraft that’s as small, nimble and lightweight as a regular kayak (not even a huge ‘barge’ fishing kayak..), and yet is as stable, dry and comfortable as a regular motorboat, and even has a similar travel range as a motorboat – they would adopt kayak fishing in growing numbers, and stick with the sport. The watercraft that combines the advantages of kayaks and motorboats, while offering better mobility than both, is the W kayak.”

The article offers an optimistic perspective of the future. According to it, many anglers who are currently displeased with kayaks as well as small motorboats would opt for the advantages offered by either human powered or motorized W kayaks.

What’s Wrong With A Rudder In A Fishing Kayak?

Many SOT and sit-in fishing kayaks feature a rudder, because most of these kayaks are so wide that they track poorly, and that’s a serious problem for you, the one sitting there and trying to direct your kayak where you want to go.

This unwanted increase in width was is the kayak manufacturers’ response the the demand for more stability, which is essential too.

Did you know that a rudder decreases your kayak’s speed by 10% in average?

Find more about why you should avoid getting a fishing kayak that features a rudder, and how you can get a fishing kayak that tracks better than any other fishing kayak, is stabler than any other fishing kayak, and yet no one ever outfitted it with a rudder because there’s no need for it.
We’re talking here about the W fishing kayak, which is not even wide – just 28.5″.